Like any other part of the home, doors can be insulated and draught-proofed to prevent heat from escaping. Building regulations state that installing a new door requires approval from the relevant buildings control body, and new external doors now generally contain integrated insulation to reduce heat loss and comply with the regulations.

A properly fitted new external door should include an effective draught-proofing system. Existing doors can be improved by fitting draught-proofing strips around the seals and the letterbox. Fitting draught-proofing to the doors and windows will save the typical household between £25 and £35 a year.

All of our doors exceed the current Building Regulations for energy efficiency, which came into force in October 2010, covering front doors for the first time. Under the legislation, all new doors sold and fitted in England and Wales must have a U-value of 1.8W/m2K (1.6W/m2K in Scotland) or less. The door’s U-value is a measure of its energy efficiency, and the lower the U-value, the more energy efficient the door.

Choosing thermal glass on our doors makes them even more energy efficient, with an ultimate U-value of just less than 1 W/m2K.

Many manufacturers of doors made of timber, aluminium or PVC panels may struggle to meet the 1.8W/m2K requirement and many do not provide proof, although there are likely to be further energy efficiency revisions in upcoming legislation in 2016.

So why wait! Upgrade your doors through Heatserve with a green deal plan and start saving now.

Click here, fill in the form and we will call you back.